Posts Tagged ‘80 Microsoft Points’

I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #83, and today’s game is “radiangames Crossfire 2”.

Anything with “radiangames” in the title is a must-buy for me, and Crossfire 2 is no different. I loved the first Crossfire, as well as his other games (“Joy Joy”, “Fireball”, “Inferno”, and “Fluid”.

If Crossfire was Space Invaders on steroids, Luke Schneider of radiangames has somehow found a way to ramp up the dosage several notches higher. Consider what was added:

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I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #81, and today’s game is “Johnny Platform’s Biscuit Romp”.

Borrowing from influences as diverse as Braid and Wario Land, Johnny Platform’s Biscuit Romp is a puzzle platfomer that’s worth a look for hardcore fans of the genre, and even worth a look if you don’t typically like platformers (as its heavier on the puzzling than on the platforming). Like Zoomaroom, this game suffers in the presentation but excels in the gameplay.

First, from the developer:

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I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #79, and today’s game is “Dock’em”.

http://marketplace.xbox.com/en-US/Product/Dockem/66acd000-77fe-1000-9115-d80258550210

From the developer:

“Dock’em is an addictively simple game that will tap every ounce of your multi-tasking ability. You will be responsible for safely navigating multiple ships into their correct ports while avoiding collisions with land and other boats. Share your times online over Xbox LIVE and compete for ship docking supremacy.”

What I love about games like this is that they’re great for (more…)

I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #69, and today’s game is “Breath of Death VII”.

I’ve been waiting for this one. I’ve wanted to pick up Breath of Death VII since I began this project, but it was always well represented in the top-50 list on the dashboard. With the recent flood of quality games, thanks to the Indie Games Winter Uprising as well as some great titles from other developers, BoD slipped out of the top 50 and I jumped at the chance to review it.

What can I say about Breath of Death VII that hasn’t already been said? Universally heralded for its combo-based battle system, its branching leveling-up system, and its innovations surrounding its treatment of random battles, it’s widely considered insanely good value for 80 Microsoft Points ($1 or so, depending on local currency). This game has an awful lot of gameplay for such a low price, a lot of humour, and a lot of video game references that even some casual fans will appreciate. One of the very best deals on the entire Xbox Dashboard.

The game is a parody of (more…)

I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #67, and today’s game is “Halfbrick Echoes”.

From the developer:

“Race to collect crystals while dodging the Echoes shadowing your footsteps in this innovative, seat-of-your-pants arcade game. Try the blend of action and strategy in Arcade Mode, the tense maneuvering of Clockwork Mode, the frenetic pace of Survival Mode or challenge a friend to an intense Duel Match. With dozens of surreal levels across seven unique gameplay modes, theres plenty for everyone.”

In Halfbrick Echoes, you have to move around the playfield collecting crystals. Simple enough right? Well, you have to avoid your “echoes” (think a ghost car in a racing game that’s mimicking your moves from a previous lap). Each gem you pick up triggers another echo, leading to a growing number of them as you play each level… and contact with an echo means instant death.

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I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #64, and today’s game is “BlindGiRl”.

This is, of all things, a puzzle game based on wave propagation. BlindGiRl was an entry in Microsoft’s 2010 DreamBuildPlay contest. It’s an intriquing concept that’s at times difficult to describe, but it’s one of the most innovative games I’ve ever played. The fact that it costs only 80 Microsoft Points is a bonus, I would have happily paid more. The game seeks to (more…)

I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #58, and today’s game is “Revenge of the Evil Aliens”.

This game blends a 1950s-era alien invasion aesthetic with a twin-stick shooter and maze elements to come up with good campy fun for 80 Microsoft Points.

Despite the stress of the person in the youtube video, I think the game is actually (more…)

I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #40, and today’s game is “ZP2K9”.

ZP2K9 is a side-scrolling shooter that draws elements from both platform games and first-person shooters. It has a laissez-faire approach to physics that lets you run up walls and along ceilings that opens up the gameplay in intriquing ways, it has a wide range of weapons, and common FPS gameplay types such as deathmatch, team deathmatch, and capture the flag. The game further differentiates itself by (more…)

I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #39, and today’s game is “FallDown”.

FallDown is an indie hit on LAN PCs and iOS devices that’s made its way to the Xbox Indie Games channel. When I first booted the game up I did was I usually do, hit start, look for something that tells me which parts of the controller do what, and then play. Hitting start right at the beginning starts the game without any further ado. The game was subsequently over in about 5 seconds, at which point it asked me if I wanted to purchase it or exit the game. What the heck?

Confused, I tried again. Same result. Was I really beating the first level in just a few seconds and then being asked to buy the game? As it turns out no, I should have RTFM.

The game’s instructions scroll across the screen when you load it up. Once you hit “start” or “A” you’re right into the action. But if you hold back from doing so, you’ll be rewarded with two things: instructions (cool!) and some genuinely amusing commentary if you wait long enough (with the game enquiring why you don’t seem to want to play, attempting to educate you on where the Start button is, etc.).

When you finally do start playing, the game launches you into a world where sawblades inexorably make their way down a shaft, and you must constantly fall down it to avoid them; last character standing wins. The game is for 1 to 8 players. 8 players you ask? Let me explain. (more…)

I’m purchasing an Xbox Live Indie Game every day, seeking out the quality titles that got lost in the shuffle and no longer appear in the top 50 downloads. Today is day #36, and today’s game is “Crystal Crush”.

Crystal Crush did something really right for me: it’s a puzzle game with a plethora of options, aside from the typical match 3 style of gameplay. It also throws in some new twists that I hadn’t seen before.

In Crystal Crush gems are propelled into the game board from three directions (from the bottom, and from the upper right and left hand corners). You can never be sure from which direction the next gem will come, and as the difficulty ramps up you’ll sometimes have gems coming from multiple directions at once nearly simultaneously. Rather than moving gems around inside a grid, you spin the entire playfield to find the optimal place for each gem to drop in. In the normal mode of play, match 3 or more gems of a single colour and they disappear. The special gems you expect to see in a game like this are here too to spice things up further. But the game modes offer a lot more variety than that, including modes where you have to create a path of a given colour from one side of the grid to another, modes where you’re trying to prevent certain colours from reaching the centre, and more besides.

For an 80 Microsoft Point game, there are a lot of different ways to play, and the unpredictability of which directions gems will be coming at the playfield from combines with that variety to keep the gameplay fresh and forces you to react quickly to changes. Recommended for anyone who has even the slightest hankering for a gem-matching puzzle game, especially for someone who’s looking for something new out of one.